Deaf-Blind Patrons Should Be Able to Go to the Movies Too

A Pennsylvania man asked a Cinemark Theatre in Pittsburgh to supply a tactile interpreter. The theatre denied his request. 

Paul McGann, a deaf-blind man who uses tactile interpretation to enjoy movies, was denied his request of tactile interpreter when he wanted to see the 2014 movie "Gone GirlWhen presented the case the Philadelphia-based 3rd U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals ruled against Cinemark in favor of the plaintiff.

"Federal disability law requires movie theaters to provide specialized interpreters to patrons who are deaf and blind, an appeals court said Friday." (Quotation from source linked in title)  

Newly Released Videos on HKNC Website

The Helen Keller National Center announces two new training videos for deaf-blind individuals and family members. These videos were developed and are presented by deaf-blind individuals and are fully accessible with captioning and transcripts.

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‘He Can’t Hear You!’: Deaf Man Shot Dead by Oklahoma City Police as Neighbors Scream in Horror

A deaf man carrying a metal pipe was fatally shot by Oklahoma City police on Tuesday night as neighbors frantically tried to tell officers that he couldn't hear their commands.

Magdiel Sanchez, 35, was shot and Tasered on a porch on Tuesday around 8:15 p.m. after he allegedly advanced toward officers following a hit-and-run involving his father, Police Capt. Bo Mathews said Wednesday.

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In time for the holidays: OSB's new Family & Friends Cookbook

Look what’s cookin’! Allison Garner reports that the Oklahoma School for the Blind Family and Friends Cookbook will be available soon. OSB staff has worked hard to get the cookbook ready in all formats. Several DRS staff throughout the agency submitted recipes and may be interested in purchasing a cookbook. OSB’s cookbook is available in print, Braille, and PDF versions that are either screen reader friendly -- or not. Get a $2 discount per item if you buy five or more items.

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OKLAHOMA STATE COURT RULES ON STATE BD. OF EXAMINERS OF CERTIFIED COURTROOM INTERPRETERS

WITHDRAWAL AND REPLACEMENT OF RULE 12 OF THE RULES OF STATE BD. OF EXAMINERS OF CERTIFIED COURTROOM INTERPRETERS
2017 OK 66
Decided: 09/11/2017

THE SUPREME COURT OF THE STATE OF OKLAHOMA
 

NOTICE: THIS OPINION HAS NOT BEEN RELEASED FOR PUBLICATION. UNTIL RELEASED, IT IS SUBJECT TO REVISION OR WITHDRAWAL.

 

Re: Withdrawal and Replacement of Rule 12 of the Rules of the State Board of Examiners of Certified Courtroom Interpreters

CERTIFIED SIGN LANGUAGE INTERPRETERS

As set forth in the Oklahoma Legal Interpreter for the Deaf and Hard-of-Hearing Act, 63 O.S. §2407, et seq., a "qualified legal interpreter" for a deaf or hard-of-hearing individual in the Oklahoma courts shall include an interpreter who has been certified by the State Board of Examiners of Certified Courtroom Interpreters. In order to provide for such a certification process by the Board, Rule 12 of the Rules of the State Board of Examiners of Certified Courtroom Interpreters, Title 20, Chapter 23, App. II, as adopted by order of the Supreme Court, 2015 OK 2, effective January 12, 2015, is hereby withdrawn and replaced in its entirety as set forth on the attached Exhibit.

Done by order of the Oklahoma Supreme Court in conference this 11th day of September, 2017.

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Children's Books in Braille for Deafblind Children

Children that are deafblind blind have dual sensory just like adults have.  It's important that deafblind children grow up embracing their differences and knowing that they are capable and able.  

Sight Hearing Encouragement Program now has a new sponsor who dedicates their time to writing books encouraging children to love their differences while embarking on a wonderful journey through literature.

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SHEP Moves Towards Bridging the Gap for Deafblind and Substance Abuse Resources

Sensory disabilities, such as blindness and deafness, can be frustrating and challenging to manage in a sight- and sound-focused world. This challenge becomes even greater if the person with the disability has a substance abuse problem. While addiction treatment can provide the tools and skills needed for an individual to recover from and manage substance use or abuse, many facilities are not equipped up to manage the needs of those who are vision or hearing impaired.

As a result, people who are blind or deaf and need substance abuse treatment may be turned away from some facilities or don't get the message and help they need. In many cases, they have even avoided trying to find treatment, due to the concern that they won't have the services or resources available at the facility.

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Oklahoma Watch: Will state’s makeover of developmental disabilities wait list be fair to families?

As the number of people waiting for developmental disabilities services has reached an all-time high, the Oklahoma Department of Human Services is considering abandoning the first-come, first-served approach to the developmental disabilities services waiting list.

Instead, it would prioritize the list according to need, meaning families who have waited for help for years could be moved back in line while others are shifted to the front.

But how that system would work, and whether it would be fair and effective, is unclear. DHS officials said the change will take years to implement. The agency has made relatively little progress during the past two years.

In the meantime, the waiting list for government-paid services for those with intellectual and developmental disabilities continues to grow, hitting a record 7,560 this year.

Personnel changes at DHS and the agency’s attention to other matters, however, have delayed changing the first-come, first-served approach, a DHS official said.

Read more from original post here.

Oklahoma City Deaf Blind man Creates Gardening service of a small company with the experience of a big company

Oklahoma businessman, Michael Vontress started his own gardening company after working with the Sight Hearing Encouragement Program.  Vontress has Usher’s Syndrome combined with retinitis pigmentosa which has effected his sight and his hearing.

After becoming a client with the Sight Hearing Encouragment Program he began working at others jobs with the help of the organization's job coach, Timothy Oakes.  Vontress was able to acquire a state job through the organization and stayed at the job for some time.  The company he worked for then let Vontress go and he had to consider going back to the typical 9-5 or venture outside the box and gain more independence. He utilized his learning from his job coach and resources from Department Rehabilitation Services (DRS), and realized that he could make a living doing what he is passionate about.

Vontress loves working outdoors and expressed that he has a green thumb and a fondness for nature.  He decided to take a step out of the norm and ventured into the business world.  He established his company, Lawn and Garden by Michael.

"There's nothing better than owning your own business." Vontress stated.  "I can now do what I love and have the confidence in doing it."

Vontress specializes in planting various types of flowers and plant life, care-taking of foiliage and maintain lawn and landscapes of residential and commercial areas.

You can reach Vontress and his services at:

Lawn & Garden by MIchael

(580)-263-9979

vontressmichael@gmail.com


 

Mustang investment advisor named spokesman for Helen Keller Deaf-Blind Awareness Week

Daniel Meek, investment advisor and accountant from Mustang, relied on assistance from Visual Services’ employment programs to adapt to his vision and hearing disabilities. Meek was asked to represent deaf-blind Oklahomans during Deaf-Blind Awareness Week by the Oklahoma Department of Rehabilitation Services.

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