Deaf-Blind Patrons Should Be Able to Go to the Movies Too

A Pennsylvania man asked a Cinemark Theatre in Pittsburgh to supply a tactile interpreter. The theatre denied his request. 

Paul McGann, a deaf-blind man who uses tactile interpretation to enjoy movies, was denied his request of tactile interpreter when he wanted to see the 2014 movie "Gone GirlWhen presented the case the Philadelphia-based 3rd U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals ruled against Cinemark in favor of the plaintiff.

"Federal disability law requires movie theaters to provide specialized interpreters to patrons who are deaf and blind, an appeals court said Friday." (Quotation from source linked in title)  

OKLAHOMA STATE COURT RULES ON STATE BD. OF EXAMINERS OF CERTIFIED COURTROOM INTERPRETERS

WITHDRAWAL AND REPLACEMENT OF RULE 12 OF THE RULES OF STATE BD. OF EXAMINERS OF CERTIFIED COURTROOM INTERPRETERS
2017 OK 66
Decided: 09/11/2017

THE SUPREME COURT OF THE STATE OF OKLAHOMA
 

NOTICE: THIS OPINION HAS NOT BEEN RELEASED FOR PUBLICATION. UNTIL RELEASED, IT IS SUBJECT TO REVISION OR WITHDRAWAL.

 

Re: Withdrawal and Replacement of Rule 12 of the Rules of the State Board of Examiners of Certified Courtroom Interpreters

CERTIFIED SIGN LANGUAGE INTERPRETERS

As set forth in the Oklahoma Legal Interpreter for the Deaf and Hard-of-Hearing Act, 63 O.S. §2407, et seq., a "qualified legal interpreter" for a deaf or hard-of-hearing individual in the Oklahoma courts shall include an interpreter who has been certified by the State Board of Examiners of Certified Courtroom Interpreters. In order to provide for such a certification process by the Board, Rule 12 of the Rules of the State Board of Examiners of Certified Courtroom Interpreters, Title 20, Chapter 23, App. II, as adopted by order of the Supreme Court, 2015 OK 2, effective January 12, 2015, is hereby withdrawn and replaced in its entirety as set forth on the attached Exhibit.

Done by order of the Oklahoma Supreme Court in conference this 11th day of September, 2017.

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